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By On November 07, 2018

Taiwan exports up over 7% year-on-year in October

Taiwan exports up over 7% year-on-year in October2018/11/07 18:24:19

CNA file photo

Taipei, Nov. 7 (CNA) Taiwan's exports rose for an eighth consecutive month on an annual basis in October because of continued solid global demand, the Ministry of Finance (MOF) said Tuesday.
Taiwan's October exports rose 7.3 percent from a year earlier to US$29.57 billion, MOF figures showed.
In addition to the launch of new gadgets by international brands in October, Taiwan's outbound sales were also boosted by more working days during the month this year than last year, the MOF said.
October was the eighth consecutive month and 24th in 25 months in which exports grew on an annual basis.
The only month in which exports posted a decline during that period was February 2018, when exports fell 1.2 percent year-on-year because of a reduced number of business days caused by a long Lunar New Year holiday.
Imports rose 17.6 percent from a year earlier to US$26.21 billion in October, leaving a trade surplus of US$3.36 billion, down 36.2 percent year-on-year, the MOF said.
In the first 10 months of the year, exports were up 8.0 percent from a year earlier to US$279.66 billion, while imports posted on increase of 12.5 percent to US$239.61 billion.
That resulted in a trade surplus of US$40.05 billion, down 12.9 percent year-on-year, the MOF said.
Looking ahead, Taiwan's exports for November should stay little changed from year earlier or rise by up to 2 percent due to a relatively high comparison base last year, the MOF said.
Exports of the electronic components sector totaled US$10.11 billion in October, up 1.0 percent from a year earlier, and accounted for 34.2 percent of total exports during the month.
Within the sector, semiconductor exports rose 1.6 percent from a year earlier to US$8.82 billion due to a wider range of tech applications, the MOF said, while exports of information/communication and video/audio devices also rose 8.5 percent to NT$3.18 billion, the data showed.
With crude oil prices still high, exports of chemical and plastics items rose 24.4 percent and 11.5 percent, respectively, from a year earlier to US$2.04 billion and US$2.18 billion, the data showed.
Exports of mineral products, base metals and machinery rose 52.3 percent, 14.2 percent and 2.7 percent, respectively, from a year earlier to US$1.32 billion, US$2.69 billion and US$2.28 billion in October, the MOF said.
Bucking the upturn, exports of optoelectronics gadgets fell 0.6 percent from a year earlier to US$1.05 billion in October, the MOF said.
China and Hong Kong remained the largest buyers of Taiwanese exports in October, with a combined value of US$12.57 billion, accounting for 42.5 percent of Taiwan's total exports a nd up 5.5 percent from a year earlier, MOF figures showed.
The Association of Southeast Asian Nations came in second, buying about US$5.16 billion in goods from Taiwan in October, up 4.3 percent from a year earlier, the MOF said.
Taiwan's exports to the U.S. rose 10.4 percent from a year earlier to US$3.39 billion in October, while exports to Europe and Japan hit US$2.63 billion and US$2.03 billion, respectively, up 8.5 percent and 18.0 percent from a year earlier, the MOF said.
(By Chiu Po-sheng and Frances Huang)
Enditem/ls

Source: Google News Taiwan | Netizen 24 Taiwan

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By On November 07, 2018

MOFA concerned about Taiwan team's exclusion from e-game tourney

MOFA concerned about Taiwan team's exclusion from e-game tourney2018/11/07 18:53:19

(Image taken from facebook.com/crazyfacetw)

Taipei, Nov. 7 (CNA) The Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MOFA) voiced grave concern Wednesday about a Taiwanese team's disqualification in a qualifying round at the Intel Extreme Masters (IEM) Katowice 2019 e-game tournament.
The ministry urged the organizer not to deprive the team of its right to play in the event due to the political stance of a specific country.
"We have asked the representative office in Frankfurt to verify the issue and have lodged a stern protest with the organizer -- Cologne-based Turtle Entertainment -- to express our grave concern and stance," MOFA said in a statement.
MOFA's response came in the wak e of reports that the Taiwanese team, called Sad Story, was disqualified by the organizer despite a first-round 16-1 victory over a Japanese team named Friendly Welcome in a "Counter Strike: Global Offensive" match in the Southeast Asia (SEA) qualifier, on the grounds that the "Taiwan team should have played in the China qualifier."
"We initially thought we should play in the China qualifier, but in order to play in that qualifier, we must have Chinese passports," said team member Crazy Face on his Facebook page, adding that they eventually succeeded in registering for the SEA qualifier.
"We have never had this problem before, not even a footnote saying in the rules that Taiwan has to register in the China qualifier. We thought it was just a mistake that East Asia (EA) or SEA forgot to note Taiwan. Fun fact, we have been playing EA and SEA tournament qualifiers for two years already," he said.
The team was disqualified after being notified that "Taiwan does not belong to any region recognized by the tournament authorities."
Taiwan is not listed in any of Asia's sub-regions in the tournament rules, but the rulebook states that "if your country is not listed, you should contact (the tournament) administration to seek clarification on which qualifier you should compete in."
The organizers noted that they use the United Nations list of countries as a measure for determining countries and regions. Taiwan is not a U.N. member.
Chinese Taipei e-Sports Association Secretary-General Hung Chi- yan (æ´ªæ¢"硯) lamented the development, but noted that a country-to- country Olympic model is not adopted in IEM Katowice, as it is a commercial activity in nature.
(By Lung Po-an, Elaine Hou and Flor Wang)
Enditem/J

Source: Google News Taiwan | Netizen 24 Taiwan

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By On November 07, 2018

Taiwan handset shipments expand mildly in 3Q18, says Digitimes Research

Taiwan handset shipments expand mildly in 3Q18, says Digitimes Research Luke Lin, DIGITIMES Research, Taipei

Shipments of handsets by Taiwan's brand vendors and ODMs expanded by a moderate 5.5% on quarter to 21.8 million units in the third quarter of 2018 as increased shipments of ODM models were offset by decreased shipments from brand vendors, according to data compiled by Digitimes Research.

The Foxconn Group ranked the top supplier among brand vendors and ODMs, buoyed by orders for both smartphones and feature phones from HMD Global (Nokia).

Brand vendor Asustek took second place, while Compal Electronics outraced HTC to become third, tha nks to a rebound in orders from Sony Mobile Communications. Arima Communication ranked fifth as its ODM orders continued dwindling.

Looking ahead, Taiwan's handset shipments are expected to record a double-digit increase sequentially in the fourth quarter, propelled by a further ramp-up of orders from HMD Global and a rebound in shipments from Asustek, Digitimes Research estimates.

Source: Google News Taiwan | Netizen 24 Taiwan

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By On November 07, 2018

China's ties with Taiwan chip firms under scrutiny in trade war

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China’s ties with Taiwan chip firms under scrutiny in trade war

REUTERS

November 7, 2018 at 14:10 JST

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TAIPEI--Washington's decision to cut off U.S. supplies to a Chinese chipmaker spotlights mounting tensions over China's drive to be a global player in computer chips and the ways in which Taiwan companies are helping it get there.

Shut out of major global semiconductor deals in recent years, China has been quietly strengthening cooperation with Taiwan chip firms by encouraging the transfer of chipmaking expertise into the mainland.

Taiwan chip giant United Microelectronics Corp. (UMC) last week halted research and development activities with its Chinese state-backed partner Fujian Jinhua Integrated Circuit Co., Ltd., following t he U.S. move.

Taiwan firms such as UMC have helped supply China with a steady pipeline of chip expertise in exchange for access to the fast-growing chip market there.

China has faced a shortage of integrated circuit (IC) chips for years. In 2017, it imported $270 billion (30.5 trillion yen) worth of semiconductors, more than its imports of crude oil.

At least 10 joint ventures or technology partnerships have been set up in the last few years between Chinese and Taiwanese firms, according to industry experts, luring Taiwanese talent with hefty salaries and generous perks.

"Such companies will need to also take care to ensure no patent or IP infringement is involved as the U.S. has export control means to restrict support of critical technology," said Randy Abrams, an analyst at Credit Suisse in Taipei.

Among the most valuable cross-strait partnerships for China would be ones that strengthen its foundry services and memory chip production. Those two sectors require much-needed help from overseas firms due to the complexity of the manufacturing technologies and intense capital requirements, analysts have said.

TRADE TENSIONS

But the technology transfer between China and self-ruled Taiwan has raised concerns amid the Sino-U.S. trade war and escalating tensions across the Taiwan Strait.

China has aggressively used "market-distorting subsidies" and "forced technology transfers" to capture traditional and emerging technology industries, Brent Christensen, the director of America's de facto embassy in Taipei, told a business gathering in late September.

"These actions are harming the United States' economy, Taiwan's economy, and other economies."

Taiwan is one of the largest exporters of IC globally and many worry the island could lose a key economic engine to its political foe.

Taiwan's government views the island's chipmakers& #039; cooperation with China cautiously and has implemented policies to ensure Taiwan's most advanced technology is not transferred.

"When businesses go to the mainland to invest in wafer production, they must accept controls including one that requires the manufacturing technology to be a generation behind," the economics ministry's industrial development bureau said in a statement to Reuters.

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY CONCERNS

Cooperation between UMC and Fujian Jinhua came under scrutiny last month, when the U.S. government put the Chinese company on a list of entities that cannot buy components, software and technology goods from U.S. firms amid allegations it stole intellectual property from U.S.-based Micron Technology. Fujian Jinhua denied the allegations.

Fujian Jinhua now faces big challenges to reach commercial high volume production as expected in 2020, industry observers say.

Last week, both UMC and Fujian Jinhua, which w as only founded in 2016, were charged with conspiring to steal trade secrets from Micron in a U.S. Justice Department indictment.

"Taiwanese tech companies need to carefully re-evaluate their positions and supply chain arrangements as the tension between the two super powers escalates," Bernstein analyst Mark Li said.

While China will need at least six years before it can catch up in chip manufacturing, according to some estimates, the scale of its chipmaking abilities is already seen as a threat in other parts of the chip supply chain.

Barely 2-1/2 years after breaking ground on a 12-inch wafer plant in China, Nexchip, a joint venture between the Chinese city of Hefei and Taiwan DRAM maker Powerchip, started producing 8,000 wafers a month. Wafers are thin pieces of material, usually consisting of silicon, used to make semiconductor chips.

Nexchip's main goal is to produce liquid crystal display driver ICs for flat-panel makers.

Usin g Powerchip's resources and Taiwanese talent, which make up a quarter of its 1,200 employees, Nexchip is helping reduce China's reliance on foreign chip suppliers.

With an aim to become "the world's No. 1 chipmaker for display drivers," Nexchip plans to build three more 12-inch wafer plants and ramp up its monthly production to 20,000 wafers by 2019, according to a person with direct knowledge of the matter.

After visiting Nexchip late last year, researchers from Taiwan's chip hub, Hsinchu Science Park, said progress at the Hefei plant was a "breakthrough."

"This will likely increase Taiwan firms' needs to invest in the China market, and it will be a test for the (Taiwan) government's industrial policy."

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Source: Google News Taiwan | Netizen 24 Taiwan

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By On November 06, 2018

Taiwan's six Pacific allies won't join China-hosted forum: MOFA

Taiwan's six Pacific allies won't join China-hosted forum: MOFA2018/11/07 12:10:17

Foreign Minister Joseph Wu

Taipei, Nov. 7 (CNA) None of the six diplomatic allies of the Republic of China (Taiwan) in the South Pacific will take part in a China-hosted summit in the region to be held Nov. 16, a Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MOFA) official said Wednesday.
Taiwan's six allies in the South Pacific -- Kiribati, Nauru, Palau, Marshall Islands, Solomon Islands and Tuvalu -- were invited to the China-Pacific Islands summit ahead of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) forum in Papua New Guinea, Foreign Minister Joseph Wu (吳釗燮) confirmed at a legislative hearing.
But none of them have agreed to attend, said Chang Chun-yu (張均宇), deputy head of the MOFA 's Department of East Asian and Pacific Affairs, at the same hearing.
"We therefore believe the Beijing-organized summit will not affect Taiwan's relations with its diplomatic allies in the region," Chang said.
Wu stressed that the ministry is closely monitoring every attempt made by Beijing to lure Taipei's diplomatic allies to avoid losing another one.
Taiwan has lost five diplomatic allies to China since President Tsai Ing-wen (è"¡è‹±æ–‡) took office in May 2016, the most recent one being El Salvador in August, cutting the country's number of allies to 17.
According to the MOFA, Australia, New Zealand, the Cook Islands, the Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, French Polynesia, New Caledonia, Niue, Papua New Guinea, Samoa, Tonga, and Vanuatu will participate in the China-led summit.
More details of the summit have yet to made public, according to the ministry.
(By Joseph Yeh)
Enditem/ls

Source: Google News Taiwan | Netizen 24 Taiwan

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By On November 06, 2018

Taiwan's six Pacific allies won't join China-hosted forum: MOFA

Taiwan's six Pacific allies won't join China-hosted forum: MOFA2018/11/07 12:10:17

Foreign Minister Joseph Wu

Taipei, Nov. 7 (CNA) None of the six diplomatic allies of the Republic of China (Taiwan) in the South Pacific will take part in a China-hosted summit in the region to be held Nov. 16, a Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MOFA) official said Wednesday.
Taiwan's six allies in the South Pacific -- Kiribati, Nauru, Palau, Marshall Islands, Solomon Islands and Tuvalu -- were invited to the China-Pacific Islands summit ahead of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) forum in Papua New Guinea, Foreign Minister Joseph Wu (吳釗燮) confirmed at a legislative hearing.
But none of them have agreed to attend, said Chang Chun-yu (張均宇), deputy head of the MOFA 's Department of East Asian and Pacific Affairs, at the same hearing.
"We therefore believe the Beijing-organized summit will not affect Taiwan's relations with its diplomatic allies in the region," Chang said.
Wu stressed that the ministry is closely monitoring every attempt made by Beijing to lure Taipei's diplomatic allies to avoid losing another one.
Taiwan has lost five diplomatic allies to China since President Tsai Ing-wen (è"¡è‹±æ–‡) took office in May 2016, the most recent one being El Salvador in August, cutting the country's number of allies to 17.
According to the MOFA, Australia, New Zealand, the Cook Islands, the Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, French Polynesia, New Caledonia, Niue, Papua New Guinea, Samoa, Tonga, and Vanuatu will participate in the China-led summit.
More details of the summit have yet to made public, according to the ministry.
(By Joseph Yeh)
Enditem/ls

Source: Google News Taiwan | Netizen 24 Taiwan